We live in a world where Sainsbury’s will share CCTV footage of your shopping trip with social security decision makers and mobile phone usage and spending patterns are routinely monitored by the Home Office. The growing use of digital technologies within the social security system in Northern Ireland have been advanced with little or no oversight or scrutiny by the body politic, by oversight bodies or by the media. PPR is pleased therefore that the UN Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty Professor Philip Alston decided to call for evidence on the impact on human rights of the introduction of digital technologies into social protection systems. Our submission covers the use of digital technologies to investigate 'fraud and error', the reliance of government on private companies to design, build and operate digital technologies in social security, lessons from the operation of the immigration system and the differential impacts of these technologies on rural communities and on people living in poverty. It makes a series of recommendations including the development of a set of Guiding Principles by the UN and the banning of private companies from social security assessments.
‘Counselling Saves Lives - it is a vital tool for GPs in suicide prevention and mental health treatment – so why is it so hard to access it?’ Public Meeting and Call to Action on Tues 18 June 2019
NEW #123G Campaign leaflet setting out the problems people experience in accessing quality counselling through their GP practice, the underlying reasons for this problem and the solutions identified by the #123GP campaign. It also outlines the support that exists for the #123GP campaign calls and how people can support the campaign.
This is a NEW campaign report from the #123GP campaign. Chapter Headings as follows: Background and Campaign Aims Stop Pretending Things are OK - the mental health crisis in NI Scratching the Surface - funding for mental health services Primary Care Pathways for accessing counselling Monitoring People's Experiences Monitoring Change: Human Rights Benchmarks and Indicators Where we are : Campaign Progress Conclusions and Recommendations Next steps
PPR's evidence on the state of economic and social rights to the UN Rapporteur Philip Alston in advance of his office's investigation into extreme poverty in the UK.
Holding mental health services to account- indicators and benchmarks
Participation Progress Report - Belfast Mental Health Rights Group

Video Podcasts

The Belfast Mental Health Rights Group (BMHRG) is made up of mental health service users and family members bereaved by suicide. 'What We Know About Change' is a short film which documents the journey of the BMHRG who through their personal experience of mental health service failures, became actively involved in working for improved care. 'What We Know About Change' chronicles the progress, the setbacks, the disappointments and the frustrations of the BMHRG through their campaigns.
On 21st May 2009, a leading international expert on health and human rights (Dr. Helen Potts) joined the PIPS/Greater Shankill Bereaved Families Rights Group to help lead a discussion with MLAs and health agencies at The Long Gallery at Stromont. The discussion, entitled "From Pillar to Post: Linking Meaningful Participation to Improved Service Delivery", will highlight the crucial role of participation of mental health service users in shaping the delivery of effective mental health services.
On 28th November 2007, the PIPS/RAYS Rights Group (a cross-community group of mental health service users and affected families in Belfast, Northern Ireland) came together to present evidence to human rights experts on the right to mental health. They hope to improve the delivery of mental health services and increase participation from affected groups in public policy decision-making.
Part 2. On 28th November 2007, the PIPS/RAYS Rights Group (a cross-community group of mental health service users and affected families in Belfast, Northern Ireland) came together to present evidence to human rights experts on the right to mental health. They hope to improve the delivery of mental health services and increase participation from affected groups in public policy decision-making.