This letter has been sent to the Minister for Communities on behalf of the Take Back the City coalition of activists and experts. It calls on the Minister to announce a moratorium on all current plans for the site of the former Mackie's engineering works in NW Belfast until due consideration is given to providing sustainable social, public and cooperative housing on the site.
The former Mackie's engineering works in West Belfast is a publicly owned, brownfield site sitting adjacent to communities with some of the highest levels of homelessness and housing stress in Northern Ireland. We have brought together activists and experts to present our vision for this site. We believe that there is a unique opportunity to turn this derelict land into an exemplary housing project, creating a world class social housing eco-village in the heart of the city.
This document lays out a menu of actions for our network to consider as we move our Internet Access for All campaign forward to its next stage.
These are the email responses we've had so far from telecoms companies who were approached by us to ensure that no one is excluded from internet access during the Covid-19 lockdown.
We're calling on telecommunications industry leaders to work swiftly with Dáil Éireann and the Northern Ireland Executive to immediately open up all WiFi hotspots cost-free and to waive the prohibitive charges for households who are unable to access decent broadband connection. Over 200 organisations and individuals have joined us in this call, and you can too at https://bit.ly/netaccess4all

Video Podcasts

BBC Newsline's coverage of the report and YouTube video released by the children of the Lower Shankill. The report and video call on the government to keep the places where they play free from broken glass.
Today, a group of young people from the Lower Shankill released a damning report (5th August 2009) and YouTube video, highlighting the dangers that broken glass poses to young people who wish to play in the available open spaces. The report calls on Belfast City Council and NI Housing Executive to address the broken glass as a matter of urgency and implement a weekly cleaning system. Through correspondence with DSD, Northern Ireland Housing Executive and Belfast City Council, repeated assurances were given that the broken glass would be cleaned up. However, evidence monitored by the group shows that little has been done and the issue remains unaddressed.
On 12th February 2009, a group of young people and residents from the Lower Shankill presented a set of concrete and reasonable recommendations to improve access to and quality of play in their community. Through the process of setting human rights indicators, the group has identified key issues for change including lighting in play areas, speed of traffic, and participation of both children and parents in decisions relating to play. The event was co-sponsored by the PPR Project, Lower Shankill Community Association, Northern Ireland Commissioner for Children and Young People and PlayBoard.
On 12th February 2009, a group of young people and residents from the Lower Shankill presented a set of concrete and reasonable recommendations to improve access to and quality of play in their community. Through the process of setting human rights indicators, the group has identified key issues for change including lighting in play areas, speed of traffic, and participation of both children and parents in decisions relating to play.
On 12th February 2009, a group of young people and residents from the Lower Shankill presented a set of concrete and reasonable recommendations to improve access to and quality of play in their community. Through the process of setting human rights indicators, the group has identified key issues for change including lighting in play areas, speed of traffic, and participation of both children and parents in decisions relating to play.